Initial Full Body Scan

Initial Full Body Scan from Elaine Hall Equine Thermographer

By: Elaine Hall Equine Thermographer  21/04/2016
Keywords: Horse, Equine, thermal

Full Body Scan (Pre & Post Exercise) Your report will comprehensively show your horse from all sides in about 120 images. I make an interpretation of the thermal patterns of your horse based on pre and post exercise images. I do not make a diagnosis. I am looking for thermal patterns and symmetry, so for comparison corresponding anatomical images are shown side by side. You will receive a digital copy of the report, emailed to you within 24 hours and both a digital and a hard copy will be posted. If requested I can email a copy to your vet and will be happy to go through the images with them.

Keywords: Equine, Horse, Infrared Thermal Imaging, Infrared Thermography, lame, thermal, thermography

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Equine Thermography from Elaine Hall Equine Thermographer thumbnail
15/02/2011

Equine Thermography

Equine Thermography provides the horse owner and equine professional with an advanced visual aid with which to locate heat, inflammation, tissue tone, cold, reduced blood circulation and some affected nerves. It is fast, portable, non-invasive, can detect injury sites before they become lameness problems and can guide practitioners and veterinarians to specific anatomic areas for study using other diagnostic techniques.